Monday, June 11, 2012

Rev. William Henry Cully: Probate Record #2

If you are just joining us as we turn back the hands of time and peer into the probate record of my 2nd Great Grandfather William Henry Cully you can catch up by going to this link: http://www.thecullyfamily.com/2012/06/rev-william-henry-cully-probate-record.html



THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA,  }  IN THE SUPERIOR COURT

CRAVEN COUNTY                                      } Before W. M. Watson C.S.C

IN THE MATTER OF THE ADMINISTRATION of the ESTATE

W.H. Cully Dec’d

James B. Robinson being sworn, doth say: That

WILL AND TESTAMENT, and that Geo. W. Cully is the proper person entitled to

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION on the Estate of the said W.H. Cully Further, that the value of said Estate, so far as can be ascertained at the date of this application, is about $1450 of which $1200 is real property, and $250 is personal property, and that

Nancy E Cully, Widow
Sarah Frances Whittington- North Harlowe, N.C.
Ambrose Evans Cully- Worcester-Mass.
Malvina Robinson- New Bern, N.C.
George W. Cully- Havelock, N.C.

Are entitled as heirs and distributes thereof.

          Sworn and subscribed before me, this

29th day of Sept 1902                  James B. Robinson

W M Watson
Clerk Superior Court.




The greatest thing happened when I read this page.  I had not known my great grandfather Ambrose's middle name.  I had always thought it was Elander.  Well..There it is in black and white "Evans".  


Melvina Robinson, Sarah Frances Whittington, George W. Cully, Ambrose E. Cully, are the children of Nancy E & William H. Cully.  James B. Robinson was the witness sworn and was the husband of Melvina.


It is a wonderful thing to see your ancestors names in writing.  This document gave supporting evidence that all of the Cully children minus Ambrose, remained in Craven County, NC after Reconstruction, and that my Great Great Grandfather Ambrose had decided to migrate northward.


My mother had written down that Ambrose was given timberland when he migrated to Worcester, and that his father was a White plantation owner.  Through my research, I discovered that William H. Cully was not white but he did own land. I am giving this information, because it is so important that when you are writing family history, that you research and document everything.  You need to make sure the stories are correct.  So let's see what we find out tomorrow.

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